How to Fast and Speed Up Your Metabolism

how to fast and speed up your metabolism

In my last blog I covered the benefits of fasting (there are a ton), and now I am super stoked to give you the deets on my personal favorite method of fasting the 16:8 system.

The 16:8 System

The 16:8 is one form of intermittent fasting (IF).

For every 24 hour day, you eat for 8 hours, leaving a 16 hour fasting period. Here are a few ways to look at it:

If your first meal of the day is at 10am, then you stop eating by 6pm.

If your first meal of the day is at 11am, then you stop eating by 7pm.

If your first meal of the day is at 12pm, then you stop eating by 8pm.

So on and so forth…

benefits of black coffee

Basically, you’re skipping breakfast, and no late night snacking. That’s it.

During the fasting period in the morning, you can drink unsweetened black coffee without cream (I love Lavazza Qualita Rossa Ground Coffee Blend, Medium Roast), tea or water.

If you are new to this fasted state the first week is the most challenging. However, your body adjusts faster than you think and your food cravings in the AM will soon disappear.

If the 16 hour fasting period seems a bit daunting at first start instead with a 14:10 system.

This means:

If your first meal of the day is at 8am, then you stop eating by 6pm.

If your first meal of the day is at 9am, then you stop eating by 7pm.

If your first meal of the day is at 10pm, then you stop eating by 8pm.

During your 8-10 hour window of eating food, eat as you would usually and without ever having to think about calorie content.

Yes, you read that right, you do not have to worry about calories.

 

 

Now, this does not mean that you are to overeat at your meals or switch over to an eat “whatever you want” lifestyle that consists of nothing but ice cream sundaes.

The food you eat should be well balanced with a focus on veggies, protein, and fiber (which I will cover in my next blog!). 

eat without restriction

You might be thinking "But wait! Doesn't fasting slow down my metabolism?" In the case of long-term caloric restriction or fasting for more than 24 hours then yes, that is one of the potential side effects.

However, fasting for short periods has been found to increase your metabolism (Mansell & Macdonald, 1990; Müller et al., 2015; Nair et al., 1987; Webber et al., 1994).

The food you eat should be well balanced with a focus on veggies, protein, and fiber (which I will cover in my next blog!). 

You might be thinking "But wait! Doesn't fasting slow down my metabolism?" In the case of long-term caloric restriction or fasting for more than 24 hours then yes, that is one of the potential side effects.

However, fasting for short periods has been found to increase your metabolism (Mansell & Macdonald, 1990; Müller et al., 2015; Nair et al., 1987; Webber et al., 1994).

Yes, you read that right, you do not have to worry about calories.

Now, this does not mean that you are to overeat at your meals or switch over to an eat “whatever you want” lifestyle that consists of nothing but ice cream sundaes.

The food you eat should be well balanced with a focus on veggies, protein, and fiber. 

You might be thinking "But wait! Doesn't fasting slow down my metabolism?" In the case of long-term caloric restriction or fasting for more than 72 hours then yes, that is one of the potential side effects.

However, fasting for short periods has been found to increase your metabolism (Mansell & Macdonald, 1990; Müller et al., 2015; Nair et al., 1987; Webber et al., 1994).

Fasting is a lifestyle tool, not a quick fix to fat loss, or to lose weight.  Approach fasting thoughtfully and consult a healthcare professional if you have any questions before getting started. 

Personally, it has totally changed my relationship with food for the better. I experience less bloating and my sleeping and totally improved (no more food babbies at bedtime!). 

XX

Maya

References

Mansell, P., & Macdonald, I. (1990). The effect of starvation on insulin-induced glucose disposal and thermogenesis in humans. Metabolism, 39(5), 502-510. doi:10.1016/0026-0495(90)90009-2

Müller, M. J., Enderle, J., Pourhassan, M., Braun, W., Eggeling, B., Lagerpusch, M., . . . Bosy-Westphal, A. (2015). Metabolic adaptation to caloric restriction and subsequent refeeding: The Minnesota Starvation Experiment revisited. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 102(4), 807-819. doi:10.3945/ajcn.115.109173

Nair, K. S., Woolf, P. D., Welle, S. L., & Matthews, D. E. (1987). Leucine, glucose, and energy metabolism after 3 days of fasting in healthy human subjects. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 46(4), 557-562. doi:10.1093/ajcn/46.4.557

Webber, J., & Macdonald, I. A. (1994). The cardiovascular, metabolic and hormonal changes accompanying acute starvation in men and women. British Journal of Nutrition, 71(03), 437. doi:10.1079/bjn19940150

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